How is the Annual Allowance calculated?

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CalculatorThe increase in the value of your pension savings in the LGPS in a year is calculated by working out the value of your benefits immediately before the start of the ‘Pension Input Period’ (PIP), increasing the value by inflation and then comparing it with the value of your benefits at the end of the PIP.

The PIP is the period over which your pension growth is measured.  From 6 April 2016, PIPs for all pension schemes will be aligned with the tax year – 6 April to 5 April.  Prior to the 2016/17 the PIP for the LGPS was 1 April to 31 March, except for the year 2015/16 when special transitional rules apply.

In the LGPS the value of your pension benefits is calculated by multiplying the amount of your annual pension by 16 and adding any lump sum you are automatically entitled to from the pension scheme plus any AVCs you or your employer has paid during the year.

If the difference in the value of pension benefits at the end of the PIP less the value of your pension benefits immediately before the start of PIP (adjusted for inflation), is more than the Annual Allowance (AA), then you may be liable to pay a tax charge.

It is important to note that the assessment for the AA covers any pension benefits you may have where you have been an active member during the year, not just benefits in the LGPS.

 
For Example:
If the increase in the value of your LGPS benefits was calculated as £30,000 in 2014/15 when the AA was £40,000, but you also had an increase in the value of other pension benefits of £15,000 in the same year, that would mean you had a total increase in pension benefits of £45,000.
 
If you did not have any carry forward, you would be liable for a tax charge for the amount you exceeded the AA limit by, even though at face value you did not breach your AA limit in either scheme.